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Savannahket

overcast 26 °C

After we left the island we boarded a shared bus to take us back to Pakse (10,000k, $1.10 each) . On the bus we picked up a lot of rice, a few locals and some ducks (who weren’t far from the pot ((in both senses: apparently they get livestock stoned before they transport them)) we figured).

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At Pakse bus station we booked a bus to Savannahket more easily than we expected, 35,000k each and it was due in about 20 minutes. Simple! When it arrived it was a rather rickety affair and was apparently VIP.....hmmmm. Nevertheless, it had windows that opened and (5!!) friendly helpful staff onboard. The only annoyance was the amount the driver used the horn, for everything from indicating to cars coming towards us on our side of the road, to cars coming towards us on their side of the road, to cows by the side of the road, to people safe in their houses. Everything. All the way. And to do it he had to touch two exposed wires on the dashboard together....nice.

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A few hours later we arrived in Savannahket and started the 3km walk from the bus station to the hotel Susie had found in the good old Lonely Planet. It was a long old walk in the sun and when we got there it was full! Gah! So we were directed down the road to another hotel LP really didn’t rave about, but which only charged 25,000k ($3 for both of us) a night! Amusingly the guide described the staff as “utterly indifferent” and indeed they were. Ah well for that much money, who can complain!

We then set off on back the way we had just come to find our main reason for coming to Savannahket, the much famed Dinosaur Museum! Unfortunately we hadn’t accounted for the French legacy of public buildings (which is alot of buildings in a communist country...) closing on the weekends and it was shut! Also, as it was Saturday it meant we wouldn’t be able to go the next day either. Very sad times indeed!
Undaunted, we continued our walk and found a rather nice looking boulevard complete with a church at the end of it - St Teresa’s!

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John also got rather excited about all the rather dilapidated but authentic French colonial buildings everywhere, Susie didn’t.

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On the boulevard we went for a Chinese – Laos style, which was far too spicy for Susie but John enjoyed it (and they even had tescos ketchup!).
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We then went to a rather nice and posh looking bar on the river. It was very overpriced and seemed to be intended to cater for Thai tastes (judging by the indecipherable menu). It would have been a great idea in London or on any river in any well used city, however here it just looked run down and unused. You can get to Thailand from Savannahket – its just across the river....

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But very few people do because the town on the other side doesn’t have a train line. The nearest one is next to Pakse. Ah well, a good idea, perhaps one day. After a much needed beerlao the sun was starting to set so we headed back to our hotel. Bit of a boring day really, though it was quite nice to see a bit of ‘real’ Laos, especially the exposed wires on a lamppost, covered by a water cylinder cut in half...

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n the morning we walked back to get the bus to Vieng Kham. On the way we got a sandwich....picture says it all....

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Posted by John_713 02:27 Archived in Laos Tagged savannahket

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